Iowaville

Iowaville, an abandoned 1840s-era town site, has lent its name to the Ioway village that preceded it on the lower reaches of the Des Moines River near Ottumwa. The Ioways lived there between about 1770 and 1824. They hunted, trapped, farmed, and traded, and also defended themselves against other groups. 

Iron knife and trade axes
About the time the Ioways moved to Iowaville, they were struggling to recover from smallpox epidemics which reduced their numbers by nearly three-fourths. By around 1800, there were only about 800 Ioway tribal members. Larger tribes were expanding their hunting grounds, leaving the Ioways vulnerable to attacks from all sides.

Iron knife and trade axes,
Allamakee and Johnson Counties
OSA file photo

 

An 1815 treaty lists the leaders and other high-ranking men who lived at Iowaville. Among them were Wyingwaha or Wangeweha (Hard Heart) and Mahaska (White Cloud). Another important resident was Wa-cha-mon-ya (One Who Kills as He Walks), a great orator who was born at Iowaville in 1785. No Heart of Fear and Walking Rain, both of whom presented the 1837 Ioway map in Washington, lived at Iowaville as children.

Artifacts

Artifacts, Essick Collection, Iowaville Site, Van Buren County
Photo courtesy of Sarah Horgen, University of Iowa, Museum of Natural History

Artifacts
 
Artifacts, Essick Collection, Iowaville Site, Van Buren County 
Photo courtesy of Sarah Horgen, University of Iowa, Museum of Natural History

Artifacts
 
Artifacts, Essick Collection, Iowaville Site, Van Buren County
Photo courtesy of Sarah Horgen, University of Iowa, Museum of Natural History

Source

Peterson, Cynthia L., and Joe Alan Artz.
2006. Phase IA Archaeological Reconnaissance Archaeological Context Development, and Geoarchaeological Assessment of the Proposed South Ottumwa Phase I Sewer Separation Project, City of OttumwaWapello County, Iowa. Contract Completion Report 1366. Office of the State Archaeologist, The University of Iowa, Iowa City.